Art History Teaching Resources (AHTR)

is a peer-populated platform for art history teachers. AHTR is home to a constantly evolving and collectively authored online repository of art history teaching content including, but not limited to, lesson plans, video introductions to museums, book reviews, image clusters, and classroom and museum activities. The site promotes discussion and reflection around new ways of teaching and learning in the art history classroom through a peer-populated blog, and fosters a collaborative virtual community for art history instructors at all career stages.

  • Assignment
    Lesson Plan
    Online Teaching

    Choose-Your-Own-Adventure Formal Analysis:Updating a Classroom Staple for the Age of Remote Learning

    August 10, 2020

    With some creativity and advanced planning, remote modalities can actually offer important silver linings to the art historical instructor. In particular, a well-designed, intentional rethinking of the classic formal analysis exercise has the potential to facilitate the inclusivity that we as instructors strive to foster.

  • Assignment
    Online Teaching

    What do you see that makes you say that?: Gallery Teaching in the (Online) Art History Classroom

    July 31, 2020

    This is a reflection on the Hammer Museum Student Educator’s recent shift to digital conversations about art. In the past few months, the educators have transitioned to facilitating conversations about works of art with adult and K-12 groups on Zoom. While the bodily relationship to works of art is lost in the digital sphere, aspects of the educator’s facilitation have become richer and more nuanced.

  • Online Teaching

    Teaching Online Now

    July 22, 2020

    AHTR was founded as a space of community to share successes, failures, and reflections on teaching art history between peers. It was also founded so folks would not have to reinvent the wheel each time they taught; instead, they could expand the knowledge and experiences of colleagues. With this in mind, we have decided to devote the AHTR Weekly to teaching art history online throughout the coming academic year.

  • Online Teaching

    Art in Quarantine Assignment

    July 17, 2020

    Like many of us, the sudden pivot to online and distance learning has inspired me to be more creative with assessments in the first year survey courses I am teaching this summer. For one particular assignment I am asking students to do their own Art in Quarantine challenge recreating works of art from our syllabus using themselves and objects from their own homes.

  • Art+Feminism logo

    Equity in Education
    OER
    Online Teaching
    Tool

    Art + Feminism Remote Learning Guide

    July 11, 2020

    Art+Feminism has tools for teaching with Wikipedia that can be easily adapted for remote learning and remixed to any subject matter. These tools are made for the virtual space, creating a rich opportunity for students to contribute directly to the act of knowledge sharing and information advocacy while honing research and writing skills.

  • CAA
    Reflection
    Teaching Strategies

    The Art History Generalist: Challenges, Strategies and the Future of Teaching Art History

    May 22, 2020

    This week’s post is a summary of a CAA 2020 session panel of the same name. Introduction [Sarah Diebel is an Associate Professor at the University of Wisconsin – Stout). She served as the Session Chair.]  I’m an art history generalist in the School of Art & Design at the University of Wisconsin-Stout with my […]

  • Uncategorized

    Activating the Classroom: Correcting Museum Labels as an In-Class Writing Activity

    May 15, 2020

    [Author: Izabel Galliera. Isabel is an Assistant Professor of Art History in the Department of Art and Design at Susquehanna University in Pennsylvania. In addition to teaching art history, she collaborates in overseeing the interdisciplinary Minor in Museum Studies. Her research interests are at the intersection of art, politics and social justice, contemporary art in a […]

  • Assignment

    Transforming an Upper Level Art History Course to Writing Intensive

    May 9, 2020

    [Author: Andrea K. Lee, Ph.D. Assistant Professor of Art. Chair, Department of Art and Design at Park University.] I teach art and art history at Park University, a small, liberal arts university in Parkville, Missouri. In addition to our flagship campus in the Midwest, Park University has forty-one campus centers in various states throughout the nation.   […]

  • Assignment
    Reflection
    Teaching Strategies

    Teaching Arnautoff: Public Art and Emotion in the Art History Classroom

    April 19, 2020

    This article was originally published in the newsletter of Public Art Dialogue, a CAA Affiliated Society that aims to provide platforms for dialogue among public art professionals and students across disciplines. Public Art Dialogue sponsors panels and discussions, publishes the peer-review journal Public Art Dialogue, and presents the PAD Award, given annually to an individual or […]

  • Assignment

    Teaching Gender with the Archive

    April 15, 2020

    [Author: Simon Soon is a professor in the Visual Arts Program, Cultural Centre, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur. His interests and contributions to art history and related fields are wide! His research focuses primarily on 19th and 20th-century art and visual culture in Southeast Asia; the region he studies is framed along two temporally and […]

  • Museums
    OER
    Reflection
    Teaching Strategies

    Teaching with the Museum: partnership as pedagogy

    March 27, 2020

    [Author: Laura M. Holzman, Associate Professor of Art History and Museum Studies and Public Scholar of Curatorial Practices and Visual Art at IUPUI.] During a public health crisis in which teachers are revising face-to-face courses for virtual formats and museums are closed to visitors, it feels odd to be writing about teaching art history in […]

  • Museums
    Reflection
    Teaching Strategies
    Tool

    The Inclusive Object Toolkit

    March 22, 2020

    A key goal of my teaching is to engage students in reading critically the processes, systems and institutional actors that produce art and art history and the ways that power has and continues to shape art history’s contours and contents. Many resources already exist to support this work. My goal was to aggregate select materials from this corpus and stage them in formats both pedagogically provocative and accessible for undergraduates. Hence the Inclusive Object Toolkit, a web-based, open access resource built in the LibGuide platform.