Mission

Art History Teaching Resources (AHTR) is a peer-populated platform for art history teachers. AHTR is home to an evolving and collectively authored online repository of art history teaching content including, but not limited to, lesson plans, video introductions to museums, book reviews, image clusters, and classroom and museum activities. The site promotes discussion and reflection around new ways of teaching and learning in the art history classroom through a peer-populated blog and fosters a collaborative virtual community for art history instructors at all career stages.

The site centers on supporting learning in the classroom, in the museum, and online by blending traditional and technological pedagogical approaches. Resources such as Smarthistory (on Smarthistory.org and Khanacademy.org), and the Metropolitan Museum of Art’s Timeline of Art History inspire the site. AHTR strives to create similarly engaging materials to support arts instructors, especially in the foundational art history survey class where students of all majors learn transferable skills in order to critically analyze their worlds through visual means.

Contact us! info@arthistoryTR.org

Content

On this constantly evolving site, you’ll find templates for some of the art history survey assignments and exams, chronologically arranged lesson plans and PPTs, thematic teaching plans and image clusters, and syllabi for a range of art history survey models. Take them and use them as a start for bigger and better things! If you can’t find what you’re looking for it’s because we don’t have that content yet; could you—or someone you know—fill in the gaps? If so, please email us or share the site with them.

You’ll also find innovative videos designed to help you access the museum in the classroom and prepare your students to engage with museum objects on class field trips.

Finally, during the semester time, the AHTR Weekly is a platform for weekly posts on a range of pedagogy topics germane to Art History.

Advisory Board

Beth Harris is co-founder and executive editor for Smarthistory and faculty emeritus at Khan Academy. She was the first director of digital learning at The Museum of Modern Art, where she started MoMA Courses Online and co-produced educational videos, websites and apps. Before joining MoMA, Beth was Associate Professor of art history and director of distance learning at the Fashion Institute of Technology where she taught both online and in the classroom. She has co-authored, with Dr. Steven Zucker, numerous articles on the future of education and the future of museums, topics she regularly addresses at conferences around the world. She received her Master’s degree from the Courtauld Institute of Art in London, and her doctorate in Art History from the Graduate Center of the City University of New York.

Renee McGarry is the senior instructional designer at the Sotheby’s Institute of Art. (All views expressed here are her own.) If you catch her after one too many cups of coffee not only will she discuss the benefits of teaching art history survey in reverse chronological order but she’ll probably also tell you about that one time she ordered a quesadilla sin queso on a research trip in Oaxaca.

Mike Murawski is the founding author and editor of ArtMuseumTeaching.com, art museum educator, and currently the Director of Education & Public Programs for the Portland Art Museum. He earned his MA and PhD in Education from American University in Washington, DC, focusing his research on educational theory and interdisciplinary learning in the arts. Prior to his position at the Portland Art Museum, he served as Director of School Services at the Saint Louis Art Museum as well as head of education and public programs at the Mildred Lane Kemper Art Museum at Washington University. Mike’s postings on this site are his own and don’t necessarily represent the Portland Art Museum’s positions, strategies, or opinions.

Steven Zuckeris is co-founder and executive editor for Smarthistory and faculty emeritus at Khan Academy. He was chair of history of art and design at Pratt Institute where he strengthened enrollment and led the renewal of curriculum across the Institute. Before that, he was dean of the School of Graduate Studies at the Fashion Institute of Technology, SUNY and chair of their art history department. He has taught at The School of Visual Arts, Hunter College, and at The Museum of Modern Art. Dr. Zucker is a recipient of the SUNY Chancellor’s Award for Excellence in Teaching. He has co-authored, with Dr. Beth Harris, numerous articles on the future of education and the future of museums, topics he regularly addresses at conferences around the world. Dr. Zucker received his Ph.D. from the Graduate Center of the City University of New York.

Advisory Board, Art History Pedagogy and Practice

See complete bios here

Susan Ball, Bruce Museum 
Rika Burnham, The Frick Collection 
Jill Cirasella, The Graduate Center, CUNY
Michael Cothren, Swarthmore College
Kelly Donahue-Wallace, The University of North Texas
Anne Kraybill, Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art
Mike Murawski, Portland Art Museum
Andrea Pappas, University of Santa Clara
Nancy Ross, Dixie State University
Deirdre Diane Spencer, University of Michigan
Anne Swartz, Savannah College of Art and Design
Luke Waltzer, The Graduate Center, CUNY
Kathleen Yancey, Florida State University

Contributing Editors

Michelle Millar Fisher  is a co-founder and Dean of Art History Teaching Resources (AHTR), a doctoral candidate in Art History at the CUNY Graduate Center, and is currently The Louis C. Madeira IV Assistant Curator of European Decorative Arts and Design at the Philadelphia Museum of Art where her next exhibition will engage design futures. She has long been interested in the confluence of gender and design, the subject of an independent co-organized exhibition and co-published book, I Will What I Want: Women, Design, and Empowerment (January 2018), in conjunction with muca-Roma, Mexico City. From 2014-2018 she was a Curatorial Assistant at the Museum of Modern Art, New York, where she co-organized, amongst others, the exhibitions Design and Violence, This Is for Everyone: Design Experiments for the Common Good, From the Collection, 1960-1969 and, most recently, the 2017 exhibition Items: Is Fashion Modern? and the accompanying catalogue. Previously, she worked at the Solomon. R. Guggenheim Museum and the Metropolitan Museum of Art. She frequently lectures at conferences and symposia. michellemillarfisher [at] gmail [dot] com

Karen Shelby is a co-founder and Dean of Art History Teaching Resources (AHTR). She is a Associate Professor of Art History at Baruch College, The City University of New York. She specializes in 19th c. European Art, 20th c. European and American Art, and Asian Art of southeast Asia and also teaches courses in the Art Market and Museum and Gallery Studies. She publishes on visual culture and the Great War. In 2015 she was a Visiting Professor at the University of Ghent supported by a Fulbright-Terra Foundation Award in the History of American Art. karen.shelby [at] gmail [dot] com

Parme Giuntini is an associate adjunct professor of Art History at Otis College of Art and Design in Los Angeles where she was Assistant Chair of Liberal Arts and Sciences and Director of Art History for 17 years. Pedagogically, her key research focus has been curriculum design, assessment, and active learning strategies. Since moving to North Carolina in 2016, she has specialized in designing pedagogies for teaching her online classes in a virtual classroom. She hopes her contributions to AHTR will broaden online pedagogies, applied learning projects, and encourage the development of better assessment practices. Her AHTR posts address flipping the classroom for the site here and she recently authored “MOOCs 2.0: Reviewing n.paradoxa’s MOOC on Contemporary Art and Feminism” for Art History: Pedagogy and Practice. pgiuntini [at] gmail [dot] com

Naraelle Hohensee is currently the Andrew W. Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow at Smarthistory.org. She holds a Ph.D. in Art History from the Graduate Center of the City University of New York and an M.A. in Media, Culture, and Communication from New York University. A specialist in post-modern architecture and urbanism, she is also a professional digital media producer with experience in television production, print, and web design.

Renee McGarry is an art historian and educational designer and technologist who is passionate about making the classroom experience engaging, innovative, and creative for students and faculty alike. She has worked in online course development at the New York University, Sotheby’s Institute of Art, and the CUNY School of Professional Studies. She is a co-founding editor of Art History Pedagogy and Practice which is dedicated to exploring the scholarship of teaching and learning in the discipline of art history (SoTL-AH).

Virginia B. Spivey is an independent art historian and educator based in Washington DC. She received her A.B. in art history from Duke University, and M.A. and Ph.D. in art history and museum studies from the joint program at Case Western Reserve University and the Cleveland Museum of Art. After 15 years teaching in museum and higher education settings, she started her own business providing expert content, curriculum and program development, and project management of initiatives to improve teaching and learning in art history, while teaching part-time in the DC region. Her scholarship, which explores intersections of dance, gender, and visual art of the 1960s, has appeared in Woman’s Art Journal and Dance Research Journal although her more recent work as a frequent contributor to Smarthistory.org and contributing author to Stokstad’s Art History (6th edition) is geared toward general audiences. She is a co-founding editor of Art History Pedagogy and Practice and speaks widely on pedagogical topics in art history.  She currently serves as chair of the College Art Association’s Education Committee, on the Educational Advisory Committee of the Digital Public Library of America, and on the Board of Trustees at Evergreen Montessori School in Silver Spring, Maryland.  virginia.spivey [at] gmail [dot] com

Kathleen Wentrack, Ph.D. is Associate Professor of Art History in the Department of Art & Design at the City University of New York, Queensborough Community College. She holds a Master’s degree from the University of Amsterdam and a Ph.D. from the Graduate Center of The City University of New York. Kathleen leads the Collaborative Assignments and Projects High Impact Practice at Queensborough and has been actively involved in pedagogical initiatives at the College. Kathleen’s most recent publications include “1970s Feminist Practice as Heterotopian: The Stichting Vrouwen in de Beeldende Kunst and the Schule für kreativen Feminismus,” in All Women Art Spaces in the Long 1970s published by Liverpool University Press in 2018 and “Part 2: The Diversity of Feminisms in an OER: The n.paradoxa MOOC.” In: “MOOCs 2.0: Reviewing n.paradoxa’s MOOC on Contemporary Art and Feminism.” Art History Pedagogy & Practice 2,(2). She is editing a forthcoming anthology on women’s art collectives in the United States entitled Collaboration, Empowerment, Change: Women’s Art Collectives and writing a monograph on the work of Ulrike Rosenbach. She has presented at conferences in the United States and Europe, on feminist art and art history pedagogy. Kathleen has served on the Committee on Women in Art of the College Art Association and is Co-Coordinator of The Feminist Art Project in New York.

 

Founders

The site was founded in 2011 by Michelle Millar Fisher and Karen Shelby—both products of the CUNY Graduate Teaching Fellows program. Contact them at info@arthistoryTR.org.

Michelle Millar Fisher  is a co-founder and Dean of Art History Teaching Resources (AHTR), a doctoral candidate in Art History at the CUNY Graduate Center, and is currently The Louis C. Madeira IV Assistant Curator of European Decorative Arts and Design at the Philadelphia Museum of Art where her next exhibition will engage design futures. She has long been interested in the confluence of gender and design, the subject of an independent co-organized exhibition and co-published book, I Will What I Want: Women, Design, and Empowerment (January 2018), in conjunction with muca-Roma, Mexico City. From 2014-2018 she was a Curatorial Assistant at the Museum of Modern Art, New York, where she co-organized, amongst others, the exhibitions Design and Violence, This Is for Everyone: Design Experiments for the Common Good, From the Collection, 1960-1969 and, most recently, the 2017 exhibition Items: Is Fashion Modern? and the accompanying catalogue. Previously, she worked at the Solomon. R. Guggenheim Museum and the Metropolitan Museum of Art. She frequently lectures at conferences and symposia. michellemillarfisher [at] gmail [dot] com

Karen Shelby is a co-founder and Dean of Art History Teaching Resources (AHTR). She is a Associate Professor of Art History at Baruch College, The City University of New York. She specializes in 19th c. European Art, 20th c. European and American Art, and Asian Art of southeast Asia and also teaches courses in the Art Market and Museum and Gallery Studies. She publishes on visual culture and the Great War. In 2015 she was a Visiting Professor at the University of Ghent supported by a Fulbright-Terra Foundation Award in the History of American Art. karen.shelby [at] gmail [dot] com